Today's Lesson

Librarian 9-5, M-F. Significantly stranger person all other times.

Posts tagged art

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terriwindling:

"Perhaps I speak only for myself, perhaps it’s different for other writers; but for me, the making of a fantasy is quite unlike the relatively ordered procedure of writing any other kind of book. I’ve never actually thought: ‘I am writing fantasy’; one simply sits down to write whatever book is knocking to be let out. But in hindsight, I can see the peculiar differences in approach. When working on a book which turns out to be a fantasy novel, I exist in a state of continual astonishment. The work begins with a deep breath and a blindly trusting step into the unknown; I know where I’m going, and who’s going with me, but I have no real idea of what I shall find along the way, or whom I’ll meet. Each time, I am striking out into a strange land, listening for the music that will tell me which way to go. And I am always overcome by wonder, and a kind of unfocused gratitude, when I arrive; and I always think of Eliot:

We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time….

Susan Cooper (Celebrating Children’s Books, 1981)

The art above is by Charles Robinson (brother of William Heath Robinson), 1870-1937.

(via ellenkushner)

Filed under writing fantasy art remember

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archiemcphee:

If Cerberus, the three-headed dog, guards the entrance to Hades, what do you suppose a three-headed deer is the guardian of? This awesome image of three fallow deer bucks, standing in a perfect row and looking backward at the same moment, was captured in the forests of Lithuania by photographer Renatas Jakaitis. But we prefer to think this photo was taken on the outskirts of the Forbidden Forest.
[via Twisted Sifter]

Hello, Hello, Hello!HELLO!

archiemcphee:

If Cerberus, the three-headed dog, guards the entrance to Hades, what do you suppose a three-headed deer is the guardian of? This awesome image of three fallow deer bucks, standing in a perfect row and looking backward at the same moment, was captured in the forests of Lithuania by photographer Renatas Jakaitis. But we prefer to think this photo was taken on the outskirts of the Forbidden Forest.

[via Twisted Sifter]

Hello, Hello, Hello!
HELLO!

(via feuervogel)

Filed under cute deer photo nature photography art

782 notes

skunkbear:

And the winner is …

Here are some of the winners from Science’s annual Visualization Challenge - you can see lots more here.

  1. Top image: “Invisible Coral Flows” by Vicente I. Fernandez, Orr H. Shapiro, Melissa S. Garren, Assaf Vardi, Roman Stocker (MIT).  The cilia of coral polyps stir up the water, helping them get food and dispose of nutrients.
  2. Middle image: “Stellate leaf hairs on Deutzia scabra” by Stephen Francis Lowry (Steve Lowry Photography). A technique called polarized light microscopy reveals the fine structure of the leaves of Fuzzy Duetzia.
  3. Bottom image: “Cortex in Metallic Pastels” by Greg Dunn, Brian Edwards (Greg Dunn Design), Marty Saggese (SfN), Tracy Bale (UPenn), and Rick Huganir (Johns Hopkins University). Dunn used gold leaf, aluminum and acrylic dye to show the layered cellular structure of the cerebral cortex. Dunn: “The neurons are painted by a technique wherein pigments are blown across the canvas using jets of air, a technique that closely emulates the spontaneous, random branching patterns of actual neurons.”

(via thehappysorceress)

Filed under science art photos nerd

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archiemcphee:

During a recent cold snap, Washington-based photographer Angela Kelly and her son used homemade soap bubble solution and her camera to create an awesome series of photos entitled Frozen in a Bubble.

In an interview with KOMO News, Kelly explains, “We blew the bubbles across the top of our frozen patio table and also upon the hood of my car and then we watched in awe as each individual bubble froze with their own unique patterns. We noted how they would freeze completely before the sun rose but that once the sun was in view they would defrost along the tops or cease freezing altogether. We also noted how they would begin to deflate and implode in on themselves making them look like alien shapes or in some cases shatter completely leaving them to look like a cracked egg.”

Visit Angela Kelly’s Flickr stream to view more of her magical winter photos. She also has some prints available via Etsy.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

(via elfgrove)

Filed under art photos